Top 8 recommendation supreme court justices books 2019

When you looking for supreme court justices books, you must consider not only the quality but also price and customer reviews. But among hundreds of product with different price range, choosing suitable supreme court justices books is not an easy task. In this post, we show you how to find the right supreme court justices books along with our top-rated reviews. Please check out our suggestions to find the best supreme court justices books for you.

Best supreme court justices books

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Jewish Justices of the Supreme Court: From Brandeis to Kagan (Brandeis Series in American Jewish History, Culture, and Life) Jewish Justices of the Supreme Court: From Brandeis to Kagan (Brandeis Series in American Jewish History, Culture, and Life)
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John Marshall: The Man Who Made the Supreme Court John Marshall: The Man Who Made the Supreme Court
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The Supreme Court: An Essential History, Second Edition The Supreme Court: An Essential History, Second Edition
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The Taney Court: Justices, Rulings, and Legacy (ABC-CLIO Supreme Court Handbooks) The Taney Court: Justices, Rulings, and Legacy (ABC-CLIO Supreme Court Handbooks)
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Supreme Court Paper Dolls (Dover Paper Dolls) Supreme Court Paper Dolls (Dover Paper Dolls)
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The Supreme Court The Supreme Court
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The Majesty of the Law: Reflections of a Supreme Court Justice The Majesty of the Law: Reflections of a Supreme Court Justice
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Choosing State Supreme Court Justices: Merit Selection and the Consequences of Institutional Reform Choosing State Supreme Court Justices: Merit Selection and the Consequences of Institutional Reform
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1. Jewish Justices of the Supreme Court: From Brandeis to Kagan (Brandeis Series in American Jewish History, Culture, and Life)

Description

Runner-up for the National Jewish Book Award, biography category (2017)

Jewish Justices of the Supreme Court examines the lives, legal careers, and legacies of the eight Jews who have served or who currently serve as justices of the U.S. Supreme Court: Louis D. Brandeis, Benjamin Cardozo, Felix Frankfurter, Arthur Goldberg, Abe Fortas, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, Stephen G. Breyer, and Elena Kagan.

David Dalin discusses the relationship that these Jewish justices have had with the presidents who appointed them, and given the judges Jewish background, investigates the antisemitism some of the justices encountered in their ascent within the legal profession before their appointment, as well as the role that antisemitism played in the attendant political debates and Senate confirmation battles.

Other topics and themes include the changing role of Jews within the American legal profession and the views and judicial opinions of each of the justices on freedom of speech, freedom of religion, the death penalty, the right to privacy, gender equality, and the rights of criminal defendants, among other issues.

2. John Marshall: The Man Who Made the Supreme Court

Description

The life of John Marshall, Founding Father and America's premier chief justice

In 1801, a genial and brilliant Revolutionary War veteran and politician became the fourth chief justice of the United States. He would hold the post for 34 years (still a record), expounding the Constitution he loved. Before he joined the Supreme Court, it was the weakling of the federal government, lacking in dignity and clout. After he died, it could never be ignored again. Through three decades of dramatic cases involving businessmen, scoundrels, Native Americans, and slaves, Marshall defended the federal government against unruly states, established the Supreme Court's right to rebuke Congress or the president, and unleashed the power of American commerce. For better and for worse, he made the Supreme Court a pillar of American life.

In John Marshall, award-winning biographer Richard Brookhiser vividly chronicles America's greatest judge and the world he made.

3. The Supreme Court: An Essential History, Second Edition

Description

For more than two centuries, the U.S. Supreme Court has provided a battleground for nearly every controversial issue in our nations history. Now a veteran team of talented historiansincluding the editors of the acclaimed Landmark Law Cases and American Society serieshave updated the most readable, astute single-volume history of this venerated institution with a new chapter on the Roberts Court.

The Supreme Court chronicles an institution that dramatically evolved from six men meeting in borrowed quarters to the most closely watched tribunal in the world. Underscoring the close connection between law and politics, the authors highlight essential issues, cases, and decisions within the context of the times in which the decisions were handed down. Deftly combining doctrine and judicial biography with case law, they demonstrate how the justices have shaped the law and how the law that the Court makes has shaped our nation, with an emphasis on how the Court respondedor failed to respondto the plight of the underdog.

Each chapter covers the Courts years under a specific Chief Justice, focusing on cases that are the most reflective of the way the Court saw the law and the world and that had the most impact on the lives of ordinary Americans. Throughout the authors reveal howin times of war, class strife, or moral revolutionthe Court sometimes voiced the conscience of the nation and sometimes seemed to lose its moral compass. Their extensive quotes from the Courts opinions and dissents illuminate its inner workings, as well as the personalities and beliefs of the justices and the often-contentious relationships among them.

Fair-minded and sharply insightful, The Supreme Court portrays an institution defined by eloquent and pedestrian decisions and by justices ranging from brilliant and wise to slow-witted and expedient. An epic and essential story, it illuminates the Courts role in our lives and its place in our history in a manner as engaging for general readers as it is rigorous for scholars.

4. The Taney Court: Justices, Rulings, and Legacy (ABC-CLIO Supreme Court Handbooks)

Feature

Used Book in Good Condition

Description

An exploration of the U.S. Supreme Court during an era of dramatic sectionalism, slavery, and the Civil War.


Includes a survey of the historical period that describes the major political, social, and economic developments of the middle decades of the 19th century such as the fierce competition between the Democratic and Whig parties, the rapid economic growth of the nation, and the Civil War

Offers an examination of the decisions reached in the Court's most important cases on the interpretation of the clauses of the Constitution relating to commerce, contract, and slavery

5. Supreme Court Paper Dolls (Dover Paper Dolls)

Description

Get better acquainted with Chief Justice John G. Roberts, Jr., Sonia Sotomayor, Ruth Bader Ginsburg, the late Antonin Scalia, and the other justices of the highest court in the land with this playful paper doll collection. The nine members of the Supreme Court are featured in doll form, dressed in street clothes. All come with a judicial robe and several accessories that reflect their personalities and interests, including tennis and cycling outfits, RV Club leisure wear, favorite baseball team uniforms, and college t-shirts.

6. The Supreme Court

Description

The sixteenth Chief Justice William H. Rehnquists classic book offers a lively and accessible history of the Supreme Court.

Chief Justice Rehnquists engaging writing illuminates both the high and low points in the Court's history, from Chief Justice Marshalls dominance of the Court during the early nineteenth century through the landmark decisions of the Warren Court. Citing cases such as the Dred Scott decision and Roosevelt's Court-packing plan, Rehnquist makes clear that the Court does not operate in a vacuum, that the justices are unavoidably influenced by their surroundings, and that their decisions have real and lasting impacts on our society. The public often hears little about the Supreme Court until decisions are handed down. Here, Rehnquist reveals its inner workings--the process by which cases are chosen, the nature of the conferences where decisions are made, and the type of debates that take place. With grace and wit, this incisive history gives a dynamic and informative account of the most powerful court in the nation and how it has shaped the direction America has taken.

7. The Majesty of the Law: Reflections of a Supreme Court Justice

Description

In this remarkable book, a national bestseller in hardcover, Sandra Day OConnor explores the law, her life as a Supreme Court Justice, and how the Court has evolved and continues to function, grow, and change as an American institution. Tracing some of the origins of American law through history, people, ideas, and landmark cases, OConnor sheds new light on the basics, exploring through personal observation the evolution of the Court and American democratic traditions. Straight-talking, clear-eyed, inspiring, The Majesty of the Law is more than a reflection on OConnors own experiences as the first female Justice of the Supreme Court; it also reveals some of the things she has learned and believes about American law and lifereflections gleaned over her years as one of the most powerful and inspiring women in American history.

8. Choosing State Supreme Court Justices: Merit Selection and the Consequences of Institutional Reform

Description

Since 1940, more than half of all states have switched at least in part from popular election or elite appointment to experiment with merit selection in choosing some or all of their state supreme court justices. Under merit selection, a commissionoften comprising some combination of judges, attorneys, and the general publicis tasked with considering applications from candidates vying to fill a judicial vacancy. Ostensibly, the commission forwards the best candidates to the governor, who ultimately appoints them. Presently, numerous states are debating whether to adopt or abolish merit selection.

In his short, sharp book, Choosing State Supreme Court Justices, Greg Goelzhauser utilizes new data on more than 1,500 state supreme court justices seated from 1960 through 2014 to answer the question, Does merit selection produce better types of judges? He traces the rise of merit selection and explores whether certain judicial selection institutions favor candidates who have better qualifications, are more diverse, and have different types of professional experience.

Goelzhausers results ultimately contribute to the broader debate concerning comparative institutional performance with respect to state judicial selection.

Conclusion

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